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Full text of "Columbia Theological Seminary Course Catalog 1874-1875"

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iniliu^inil Srminan] 


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OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLE OF THE 


PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES. 


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COLUMBIA, S. C. j 


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1874-1875. 


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( A T.\ LOG I ■ I •: 



OFFICERS AMI STUDENTS 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 



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Board of Directors. 



Hon. JAMES HEMPHILL, Chairman, Chester, S. C. 

T. B. FRASER, Esq., Secretary, Sumter. S. C. 

HENRY MULLER, Esq., Treasurer, Columbia, S. C. 

Kkv. J. LEIGHTON WILSON, D. D., Mayesville, 8. C. 

Rbv. J. o. LINDSAY. Due West, S. C. 

Rbv. JOHN DOUGLAS, Charlotte, X. C. 

Rev. A. W. CLISBY, Macon, Ga. 

Kkv. DoNALD McQUEEN, D. D.. Sumter, s. c. 

JAMES W. BONES. Esq., Rome, Ga. 

Hon. J. J. GRESHAM, Macon, Ga. 

A. BREVARD DAVIDSON, Esq., Charlotte, N. C. 

w E .JACKSON. Esq., Augusta, Ga. 



4 CATALOGUE. 



Faculty. 



Acce88U8. Exitus. 

1828. Thomas Gouldixg,* D. D., Professor of Ecclesias- 
tical History and Church Polity. 1834. 

1831. George Howe, D. D., LL.D., Professor of Biblical 
Literature. 

1833. A. W. Lelaxd,* D. D., Professor of Christian 

Theology. 1856. 

1836. Charles Colcock Joxes,* D. D., Professor of 

Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity. 1838. 

1848. Charles Colcock Jones,* D. D., Professor of 

Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity. 1850. 

1852. Alex. T. McGill, D. D., Professor of Ecclesias- 

tical History and Church Polity. 1853. 

1853. B. M. Palmer, D. D., LL.D., Provisional Instruc- 

tor in Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity. 1853. 

1854. B. M. Palmer, D. D., LL.D., Professor of Eccle- 

siastical History and Church Polity. 1856. 

1856. A. W. Lelaxd,* D. D., Professor of Sacred Rhetoric 

and Pastoral Theology. 1871. 

1856. J. H. Thornwell,* D. D., LL.D., Professor of 

Didactic and Polemic Theology. 1862. 

1857. J. B. Adger, D. D., Professor of Ecclesiastical 

History and Church Polity. 1874. 

1861. James Woodrow, Ph. D., D. D., Perkins Professor 

of Natural Science in connexion with Revelation. 
1867. William S. Plumer, D. D., LL.D., Professor of 

Didactic and Polemic Theology. 
1870. Joseph R. Wilsox, D. D., Professor of Pastoral and 

Evangelistic Theology and Sacred Rhetoric. 1874. 



TUTORS IN HEBREW. 

1851. Bazile Lanneau,* A. M. 1855. 

1856. James Cohen,- A. M. 1862. 

1874. Chari.es R. Hemphill. 



^Deceased. 



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CATAL 






. I / / .1/ \7. 



Whole Dumber of Alumni, 
Deceased, 



449 



Foreign Missionaries, 








17 


STATES, 




From Massachusetts, . 


7 


From Missouri, . 


•2 


New , \ «>rk, . 


10 


Rhode Island. 


1 


Pennsylvania, 


L9 


Vermont, . 


1 


Ohio 


2 


Connecticut, . 


5 


Virginia, . 


6 


New Hampshire, . 


2 


North < larolina, . 


60 


New Jersej 


, 


4 


South < larolina, , 


155 


Maryland, 




1 


Georgia, . 


79 


Florida, 




2 


Arkansas, 


7 


Canada, 




2 


Alabama, . 


31 


Scotland, 




2 


Mississippi, . 


29 


Ireland, 




9 

• » 


Louisiana, 


• ) 


Hungary, 




1 


Tennessee, 


10 


England, 




1 


Kentucky, 


3 












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CATALOGUE. 



North Carolina, 








43 


Louisiana, 






8 


Georgia, . 








56 


Alabama, . 








28 


Massachusetts, 








2 


South Carolina, 








97 


New Jersey, . 
Pennsylvania, 
Tennessee, . 








2 

3 

11 


Mississippi, 
California, 










39 
1 


Texas, 










12 


Illinois, . 










. 5 


Indiana, . 










1 


Arkansas, 










. 16 


Florida, . 










13 


New Hampshire, 






1 


Vermont, . 










1 



Kentucky, 8 

Connecticut, 2 

New York, . . . . . 6 

Maryland, . 2 

Virginia, 9 

Ohio, 1 

Minnesota, 1 

Missouri, 2 

Oregon, 1 

Ireland, 1 

Scotland, 2 

Japan, 2 

India, 1 

Brazil, 4 

United States of Colombia, 1 

China, 4 

Indian Nation, .... 4 

Places of residence not known, 58 



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CATAI ■ 



TERM OF 1874-75 



FACUl TT. 
GEORGE HOWE, I). D., LL.D., 

Professor of Biblicnl Literature. 

JAMES WOODROW, Ph. I).. I). I).. 

Perkins Professor of Natural Science in connexion with Revelation. 

W.M. S. PLUMER, D. I).. LL.D., 

Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. 



Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity. 



Professor of Pastoral and Evangelistic Theology and Sacred Rhetoric. 

CHARLES R. BEMPHILL, 

Tutor in Hebrew. 



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CATALOGUE. 



STUDENTS. 



SENIOM CLASS.' 



Names. 
ANDERSON, J. J. 
BLACK, JAMES S. 
CRAWFORD, WM. B. 
CURRY, ALBERT B. 
ENGLISH, THOS. R. 
FAIR, J. Y. 
FLINN, JOHN WM. 
GARRISS, H. B. S. 
GINN, ISAAC M. 
JONES, JAMES E. 
KIRKPATRICK, R. M. 
LIGON, RICHARD C. 
LONG, N. M. 
McILWAIN, WM. E. 
RANKIN, D. C. 
REID, R03ERT A. 
RHEA, J. MONTGOMERY 
SMITH, ROBERT N. 
WITHERSPOON, J. 



Residences. 
Summerfield, Ala. 
Burgaw, N. C. 
Arkadelphia, Ark 
Bainbridge, Ga. 
Mayesville, S. C. 
Newberry, S. C. 
Holly Springs, Miss. 
South Washington, N. C 
Araandaville, Ga. 
Dirt Town, Ga. 
Fort Deposit, Ala. 
Abbeville, S. C. 
Sumaierville, Tenn. 
Providence, N. C. 
Winston, N. C. 
Moffettsville, S. C. 
BlouDtville, Tenn. 
Jonesboro, Ga. 
Columbus, Miss. 



College. Gr 

Davidson College. 

Davidson College. 

Davidson College. 
Student University of Va. 
University of Miss. 

Oglethorpe Univ. 

Davidson College. 
Erskine College. 
King College. 
Erskine College. 
Student Stewart College. 
Erskine College. 
King College, Tenn. 
Oglethorpe Univ. 
University of Miss. 



actuated. 
1871. 

1872. 

1S72. 
1871. 
1871. 



Senior Class, 19. 



MIDDLE CLASS. 



Room. 

4 L.H. 

31 S. II. 

15 L. H. 
48 S. H. 
42 S. H. 

16 L. H. 

17 L. H. 



1872. 


25 S. H. 




2 L. II. 


1871. 


40S.H. 


1872. 


38 S. H. 


1871. 


21 L. H . 


1872. 


20 L. H. 


1872. 


24 L. H. 


1872. 


18 L. H. 


1872. 


14 L. H. 


1872. 


32 S. H. 


1872. 


12 L. H. 



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Names. 


Residences. 


College. 


Graduated 


Room. 


ALLISON, JOS. Y. 


Concord, N. C. 


Student Univ. of Va. 


18G8. 


36 S. H. 


HAS3ELL, A. M. 


Crockett, Texas. 


Student Austin Col. 


1873. 


9 L. H. 


HENDERSON, JOHN. 


Ontario, Canada. 






13 L. II. 


HO L LINGS WORTH, W. 


T. Atlanta, Ga. 


Oglethorpe Univ. 


1872. 


1 L. H. 


JOHNSON, J. J. 


Euharlee, Ga. 


Student Davidson Col. 


1873. 


11 L. H. 


KIRKPATRICK, M. R. 


Fort Deposit, Ala. 


Davidson College. 


1873. 


40 S. H. 


McRAE, D. A. 


Harnett Co, N. C. 






27 S. H. 


MORRIS, S. LESLIE 


Abbeville, S, C. 


Erskine College. 


1873. 


10 L. II. 


ROGAN, JAMES W. . 


Bristol, Tenn. 


King College, Tenn. 


1873. 


22 L. H. 


WALLACE, W. G. F. 


Clayton, Ala. 


Davidson College. 


1873. 


30 S. II. 


WILSON, A. W. 


Yorkville, S. C. 


Davidson College. 


1S73. 


28 S. II. 




Middle Class, 11. 














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JUNIOR CI I w 









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BOYD, w M 


[ndoatry, 1 




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1-71. 




BR] i i M . 


Qrlffli 




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HRUCE J TALLULAB 


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Ogl thorpe (Jnireralty. 






1>\\ IS. K!>\\ AKI» IV 


l'l«M-.llit 1, 


0. 


l>:iM.l-..h Ool 






tfoQl kkn. i">\ \u» 


fainter, B 




Dai Ida Soil 


1-7 4. 




M.w l l.i 8 w 


Oxford, m 




l mv.-iMt\ M -- 


1874. 




NKW TON 1 


Dnlon Poll 




On i reni t j < la. 








Junior 









SUMMAMW. 

19 

Middle Claw 11 

.hi!ii'»r ClMU 8 





I. II -Lin ll.ll. & I! .—Sim »na lliill. i 



REPRESEXTA TIG V. 



(DQE,Ej1E(&ES, 



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II 11 

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10 



CATALOGUE. 



Sessions* 

There is but one session in the Seminary year. The year 
commences on the third Monday in September, and ends with 
the second Thursday in May. 



The regular time for admission to the Seminary is in Septem- 
ber. It is very desirable that all Students should be present at 
the commencement of the year, particularly those entering the 
Junior Class. 

The Seminary is open to Students of every denomination. 
Candidates for admission must furnish the Faculty with satisfac- 
tory testimonials of being in full communion with some Christian 
Church, and of having been regularly educated at some College 
or University, or in the absence of such testimonials, must satisfy 
the Faculty, by examination, that they have made attainments 
deemed equivalent. Such persons, on assenting to the Consti- 
tution of the Seminary, are admitted to the enjoyment of all its 
privileges. 



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SYudj/. 



Tin- Regular < 'ourse of Studj embraces ;i period of thr< e yi ai a, 
mikI covers the sei pral departments of Theological education. 



I. Biblical Literature. 



1 . Tlic Grammar of the 1 1< 1 rev and < baldce I i 1 ; i i g< - ai d the 
Grammatical and Exegetical stud\ of the Hebren and < baldee 
Scriptures. Portions of the Historical, Poetical, and Pro- 
phetic Books, and the Chaldee of Ezra and Daniel are read. 
To these are added written exercises in translating from Eng- 
lish or the Greek <>t" tin* Apocrypha into Hebrew. 

'2. Tl retical study of the NYu Testament in Greek. The 

four Gospel 8 in Harmony, the more important Epistles, are 
the Bubjects of Exegesis, the effort being to lead the Student, 
in the ase «>t" the best helps, to m thorough knowledge of the 
original. 

3. Biblical Antiquities ture, Geography, Introduction to 

the Old and New Testaments, Biblical Criticism, The Canon 
the Scriptures, (reference being had to 'the views of the 
Church of Rome and to modern Bceptical th( the Orig- 

inal Languages of Scripture as to their character, history, and 
affinities, Interpretation and Prophecy, are topics of instruc- 
tion 1>\ T ■ !'• oks or I.< < tun b. Oci asi< nal < 
by Stud< nts. 



II. Ecclesiastical History and Chmch Polity. 

The Junior Class is occupied thrice every week with Old 
tament Church History, the text-book -being Kurtz - Manual 
of Sacred History. After finishing that work, they take ap 
Schaff's History of the Christian Church, Vol. I, Part II.. 
which treats ofth< and third centuries. 'I !•• I.- 

to this class are chief! v unw ritten. 



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CATALOGUE. 



2. The Middle Class use for their text-books Kurtz's History of 
the Christian Church, in two volumes, and Killen's Ancient 
Church. The Professor meets this Class three times every 
week, and supplements the text-b6oks with lectures. 

3. The third year is devoted to Church Polity. The text-books 
are Bannerman's Church of Christ, Calvin's Institutes, Book 
IV., and Gillespie's Assertion of the Government of the 
Church of Scotland. The Professor meets this Class also 
three times every week, either for lecture or for examination 
on the text-book. Particular attention is given to the exposi- 
tion of our Form of Government and Book of Discipline. 

III. Pastoral and Evangelistic Theology. 

In this department instruction is given by means of carefully 
prepared lectures, embracing the whole subject of ministerial call 
and character, together with the duties, relations, and functions 
of the evangelist's office, including its special application to 
foreign missionary work. Besides, the Pastoral Epistles in the 
original are minutely analysed and fully interpreted. 

IV. Sacred Rhetoric. 

Lectures are delivered upon this branch of study, which are 
supplemented (on separate days) by a close examination of the 
principles of Rhetoric proper, with the aid of the latest edition of 
"Whately as a text -book. In addition, the analysis, with elabo- 
rate explanations, of portions of the Scripture, with the view of 
aiding the Student to a correct view of the homiletic art and of 
expository preaching, constitutes one of the regular recitations. 
Sermons are also delivered memoriter in the presence of the 
Professor in charge; also original pieces are declaimed for direct 
improvement in oratory, and debates are engaged in for readiness 
in extemporaneous speech; all of which exercises are carefully 
criticised. 



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V. Natural Scienoe. in connexion with Revealed Religion 

In tlii- department, instruction ia given exclusively by lectures. 
It embraces the Natural History of the Bible ; Geology, Astron- 
omy, and other branches of Natural Science, as Sir as they have 
any real or supposed connexion with Revelation; and also Ar- 
chaeology and Chronology. During the Senior year, the ques- 
tion of the Unity of the Human Race is fully examined. 

VI. Didactic Theology. 

In this department, each leading topic is introduced to the 
minds of the classes by one or more lectures. Continual refer- 
ence is had to the best writers on cadi topic. One day in the 
week is Bet aside for conversation <»n the matters already lt* -j > t ■ 
over, and to the reading of short essays on subjects previously 
grned. Proof texts arc constantly required on points of Re- 
vealed Theology. 

VII. Polemic Theology. 

This is a distinct branch of study, and claims special attention 
one day cadi week. For about half the Session it is taught by 
Lecture-, afterward- each Student reads an essay on Borne con- 
troverted matter which had been previously assigned to bim, and 
the whole class is interrogated on the course of Btudy pursued. 
Stapfer and Hill are often referred to; but no one text-book is 
adopted. The course embraces all the topics fairly belonging t<» 
the subje 

VIII. Mental and Moral Science. 

A brief course in this branch of knowledge belongs to the close 
of the Junior year. It- chief object is to revive knowledge pre- 
viously acquired, and to render it certain' tlmt the Professor and 
Students will use term- in the same sense during the Theol 

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CATALOGUE. 

FOURTH YEAR'S COURSE. 

For those who prefer to extend their studies through a longer 
term, the following additional course is arrranged for a Fourth 
Year: 

Study of the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures continued; Com- 
parative Semitic Philogy; Church History continued to the 
present period ; Ecclesiology ; Characteristics of the most emi- 
nent and successful Preachers of the Gospel; Theology contin- 
ued; Contributions of Science to Natural Theology and Illustra- 
tion of Scriptures. 



Instruction may also be obtained in the city in the French, 



German, It 



aiian, a 



nd Spanish languages. 



PROFESSORS' COXFEREJYCE. 

Thursday evening is occupied by the Professors in familiar 
conference before the Students, upon personal piety, the best 
plan and method of study, and kindred topics. 



BUILDINGS. 

These are neat and commodious. The Central Building is 
devoted to the Library and other public purposes. Law Hall 
and Simons Hall were planned especially for the comfort of the 
Students, and are supplied with the most necessary articles of 
furniture. 



LIBRARY. 

The Library of the Seminary, to which the extensive and 
choice Library of the Rev. Dr. Smyth, of Charleston, was added 



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Borne years ago, no\> embraces 18,871 volumes. Besides tl. 
the private Libraries of the Professors are large and valuable. 
The use of the University Library is also extended, by courti 
to tli*- [nstructors of the Seminary, a collection of lti*« :i t value, 
and now amounting to more than 25,000 volumes. 



EXPENSES. 

The Board and Washing of a Student residing in the Semina- 
ry amount to from one hundred and thirty to one hundred :m<l 
fifty dollars per annum. The Institution h tabh founda- 

tion, and no charge is made for room-rent, tuition, or use of 
Library. Provision is also made for the support of Students 
w liu are in need <>f aid. 



ECCLESIASTICAL RELATIONS* 

The Seminary, formerly related to the three Synods of South 
< Carolina, l, and Alabama, is now under the control of the 

ril Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States. 



LOCATION. 

The Seminary is pleasantly situated in the city of Colombia — 
;i place remarkable for health, the capital of* the Si S ath 

lina, theseatofthe University and other public [nstitul 
of - by railways, which are connecting it more and 

more with other portions of the Smith and Southwest, and makii 
it easy of access from any part of the United S 

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CATALOGUE. 



FORM OF BEQUEST, 

The Seminary is incorporated by the Legislature of South 
Carolina under its original name, and the proper form of a bequest 
would be as follows : 

" To the Board of Directors of the Theological Seminary of the 
Synod of South Carolina and Georgia, to them and their succes- 
sors, I give and bequeath the sum of , (or, devise a certain 

parcel or tract of land, etc.,) to be applied by them to the uses 
and benefits of the Seminary." 

Testators will do well to have respect to the laws of the State 
in which they reside. The State of South Carolina requires 
that a last Will and Testament be signed by the testator in the 
presence of three witnesses. 



The next term will begin on Monday, September 20, 1875. 



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